Projects

  • Measuring Justice Needs and Satisfaction in Tunisia

    Measuring Justice Needs and Satisfaction in Tunisia

    In October and November 2016, HiiL conducted a Justice Needs and Satisfaction Survey in Tunisia. The data reveals the most pressing justice needs of Tunisians and enables evidence based decision making in the judicial sphere. In October 2017, HiiL conducted a follow-up workshop around employment justice in Tunis in order to build a coalition of stakeholders that moves from data to action. The project is part of a multi-country strategic program commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  • Measuring Justice Needs and Satisfaction in Lebanon

    Measuring Justice Needs and Satisfaction in Lebanon

    In 2017 HiiL will be conducting research in Lebanon to reveal the justice needs and satisfaction of the people living there and enable evidence based decision making in the judicial sphere. This study is part of a larger multi-country project commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  • Justice Needs Survey in Bangladesh

    Justice Needs Survey in Bangladesh

    HiiL is currently in the process of setting up a Justice Needs Survey in Bangladesh as part of our larger multi-country project commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Respondents will be interviewed about their specific justice needs and their pursued paths to justice. While also highlighting their perceptions on the quality the procedure, quality of the outcomes, and costs of these paths to justice. Additionally, the research will cover general perceptions and attitudes regarding the justice system in Bangladesh.

  • Justice Needs Survey in Kenya

    Justice Needs Survey in Kenya

    Together with the World Bank, the Judiciary of Kenya have commissioned HiiL to conduct the Justice Needs and Satisfaction survey [JNS], commencing in 2017 in the Republic of Kenya. More than 6000 randomly selected Kenyans will be interviewed about their legal needs, and will provide in-depth information about their justice journeys. The key objective of this JNS is to learn what are the most serious and prevalent justice problems in Kenya; to map out how the users of justice perceive the quality of the justice processes and the quality of the justice outcomes. The study will also look at Kenyans’ perceptions on public and private institutions, as well as their levels of legal empowerment.

  • Justice Needs & Satisfaction Survey goes to the heart of understanding justice needs in the UAE

    Justice Needs & Satisfaction Survey goes to the heart of understanding justice needs in the UAE

    HiiL, in partnership with the The Ministry of Justice of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), identified the most pressing justice problems that residents of the UAE (both locals and expats) face. The Justice Needs and Satisfaction Tool (JNST) is able to track relevant elements of justice pathways of those residing in the UAE.

    The Justice Needs and Satisfaction Report aims to assist the Ministry of Justice in further improving their delivery of justice as well as in prioritising and innovating around the needs and expectations of their residents.

  • Justice Needs & Satisfaction in Uganda

    Justice Needs & Satisfaction in Uganda

    HiiL has developed the Justice Needs and Satisfaction tool (JNS) which provides data about the justice needs of citizens and data on the quality of their justice journeys. In 2015, HiiL and The Hague Institute for Global Justice partnered to apply the JNS tool in Uganda in a project co-funded by the Swedish Embassy in Uganda (SIDA) and The Hague Institute for Global Justice.

  • Measuring Justice Needs and Satisfaction in Jordan

    HiiL is currently conducting the Justice Needs and Satisfaction survey in Jordan as a way to contribute to evidence-based innovation in access to justice in the country. This research is part of the larger multi-country project commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  • Evidence-based Access to Justice in Ukraine

    Evidence-based Access to Justice in Ukraine

    HiiL listened to more than 6500 people from all over the country to understand their justice needs and experiences. The main findings are that millions of people need more accessible, affordable, effective and fair justice journeys. Particularly acute are the justice needs of the internally displaced people (IDPs). Better access to justice can be achieved through continuous focus on the users, re-design of existing justice journeys and encouragement of innovative approaches to justice. In 2016 and 2017 our project continues with turning the justice evidence into actions that improve the justice journeys available to the people of Ukraine.

  • Programme Generation Tool: Phase 2

    Programme Generation Tool: Phase 2

    At HiiL Innovating Justice we are always looking for new ways to innovate measuring justice tools. At the end of 2014, we initiated a new phase in the development of the Programme Generation Tool (PGT). This is a tool that supports Rule of Law programming in countries around the world. In this new phase, the tool will be further developed to move from a prototype to a functional web application.

  • Guardians of Justice in Indonesia

    Guardians of Justice in Indonesia

    The Guardians of Justice (GoJ) programme in Indonesia is an extension of an earlier GoJ project that started in 2013. The programme aims to improve the delivery of justice to people around the world by empowering local civil society organisations to monitor citizen’s experiences with the justice system. Armed with this data, these organisations progress to become Guardians of Justice whose aim it is to hold justice delivery organisations accountable and to effectively push for change where it is needed most.

  • Study on Transitional Justice in Yemen

    Study on Transitional Justice in Yemen

    HiiL is participating in an ambitious study on the Transitional Justice process in Yemen. This study was procured by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) in Yemen.

  • Justice needs in Mali

    Justice needs in Mali

    In December 2013 HiiL was contracted by the Dutch Embassy in Bamako to conduct a large scale study of the justice needs and satisfaction with the available paths to justice in Mali.

  • Guardians of Justice: innovative access to justice

    Guardians of Justice: innovative access to justice

    The Guardians of Justice (GoJ) programme, aims to improve the delivery of justice to people around the world. It does so through the empowerment of local Civil society organisations (CSOs). They will collect and use data about the justice needs of ordinary people, in their day to day lives, and analyse the paths they follow in order to deal with them. Armed with this data, these organisations progress to become Guardians of Justice whose aim it is to hold justice delivery organisations to account and to effectively push for change where it is needed most.

  • Evaluating local justice facilitators in Nicaragua

    Evaluating local justice facilitators in Nicaragua

    HiiL has undertaken an assignment delegated by Organisation of American State (OAS) to perform an Impact Evaluation of a specific paralegal programme in Nicaragua. OAS has been trialing this programme in Central America to provide communities with a better access to justice. These communities do not have proper access to courts, police or similar legal services.

  • Effective regulation of cross-border activities

    Companies and regulators face choices. Companies can take private regulation initiatives, but can also wait to be regulated by national or international government agencies. These regulators have the option to take action, or to leave the initiative to other actors in the rulemaking process. What are the trade-offs here? What guarantees are in place for accountability and transparency? 

  • Informal international law-making and accountability

    Leaders meet informally on an almost weekly basis. Their decisions affect livelihoods and businesses. Can citizens still hold them accountable?

  • Effective and fair court hearings

    Litigants like to be better informed about what will happen. Judges and lawyers expect a cooperative attitude and much more.

  • Measuring costs and quality of access to justice

    It is based on research about what people value in a process and on how they evaluate outcomes. The method can be used for court procedures, ADR procedures, legislative processes and for any process in which two or more parties take decisions about conflicts or other issues.