2018

  • Measuring Justice in Mali: The Second Wave

    Measuring Justice in Mali: The Second Wave 22 May 2018

    By Grace Ellis, Measuring Justice Intern

    Throughout May and June, we are interviewing over 9,000 people in Mali about their encounters with legal problems in everyday life. This is part of HiiL’s collaboration with Mali’s Ministry of Justice as we work together on the second wave of the Justice Needs and Satisfaction Survey. The interview data will show the most serious and prevalent justice problems in Mali, what people do to resolve their problems and how they assess these paths to justice in terms of fairness, quality and costs.

  • Access to justice in Bangladesh – Challenges and the potential for regional leadership

    Access to justice in Bangladesh – Challenges and the potential for regional leadership 16 May 2018

    By Martijn Kind, Quantitative Justice Data Analyst

    On Wednesday the 9th of May 2018, HiiL, in close cooperation with BRAC Human Rights and Legal Aid Services, launched its ‘Justice Needs and Satisfaction in Bangladesh’ report. The event was broadly attended by active members of civil society and generously chaired by the chairman of the National Human Rights Commission, Mr. Kazi Reazul Hoque. The report pinpoints areas of improvement for access to justice in Bangladesh and can serve as a benchmark for policy makers.

  • How innovators are developing a para-mediator network to settle civil disputes in Northern Uganda

    How innovators are developing a para-mediator network to settle civil disputes in Northern Uganda 25 April 2018

    By Nathalie Dijkman, Justice Sector Advisor

    In the small town of Arua, right next to the DRC border, a few entrepreneurial lawyers have set up an independent mediation center to deal with the increasing number of land disputes that flood the Courts of Law. With two accredited mediators, two legal clerks, one lawyer and one operations manager, the small cemented house along the main road appears like a mini court of itself – only that it feels more intimate and welcoming. I wonder how much easier it must be for, say, a single mother of three who is defending her plot of land to simply enter the modest building to find a place where she can discuss her legal problems as one would with a friend. As opposed to facing a row of judges sitting on a raised wooden bench in the search of justice, which one speaks to most people more?

  • New report on Justice Needs of Syrian Refugees released

    New report on Justice Needs of Syrian Refugees released 29 March 2018

    By Nadja Kernchen, Research Assistant / Measuring Justice

    The war in Syria has forced millions of Syrians to flee their country. They are particularly vulnerable and live under difficult circumstances in their host countries. Access to justice, especially to formal institutions, is particularly challenging due to missing residence permits and critical documentation. Most refugees rely on themselves and their (often small) social network to seek information and resolve their problems. The biggest barrier which prevents many from engaging in dispute resolution is that the refugees do not believe that they will succeed or achieve a positive result.

  • Measuring Justice in Fiji: Experiences from the Pacific

    Measuring Justice in Fiji: Experiences from the Pacific 23 March 2018

    By Dr. Martin Gramatikov, Director Measuring Justice

  • Workshop on Innovation for Improved Justice Journeys Held in Kramatorsk

    Workshop on Innovation for Improved Justice Journeys Held in Kramatorsk 01 March 2018

    By Borja Gutierrez, Customer Journey Expert