Trend report: can we trust lawmaking going private, international and informal?

Trend report: can we trust lawmaking going private, international and informal? 05 October 2012

National bank presidents, world leaders and corporate networks meet in hotels where they set the rules of the game. Many people distrust these processes, and for good reasons. At the same time, they benefit from such rules when they take a plane, buy safe food or see trade in blood diamonds restricted.

HiiL’s Trend report Rulejungling: When lawmaking goes private, international and informal analyses where lawyers, courts and parliaments in national states lose control. Innovative processes will have to ensure people still have a say in how they are governed. A truly global and trustworthy rulemaking profession can be part of the answer.

The Trend report is based on the results of nine HiiL Research Projects with leading researchers on multilevel rulemaking. It is built on research, interviews and workshops within HiiL’s international networks of experts in the rule of law.

The report shows that rulemaking is becoming ever more international, private and informal. It analyses how the new rule making processes work and what benefits they have, and which challenges remain. Four major needs for innovation are identified. These needs clearly show: it is time for lawyers at ministries and courts to adjust their strategies. They cannot afford to ignore the impact of modern-style rulemaking on their work processes.

Rulejungling is the topic of the HiiL's upcoming Innovating Justice Forum on 1-2 November in The Hague. Learn more.

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